Screenshot: Calendar and dose manipulation

**UPDATE  06/05/2012** Contains old screenshots!

 

What would Google do? I ask this question a lot, and for good reason. Google is one of the most successful companies in human history. I use apps like Google mail calendar and chat every day. For me, it is logical to seek out and learn from such a great company. So, I ask myself,  what has Google done that can help me write this software?


Well, i spent a good afternoon going through google calendar in the web debugging tool firebug, figuring out how they did their styling and table layouts. It seems they use a good mix of table and div layout. For those who are unfamiliar, there is a sort-of religious war between people who think html layout with divs is superior and those who prefer tables. One thing that did surprise me was the use of the ROWSPAN attribute. They use this to display an event over a number of days in a week. I ended up not using rowspan because I want to display some data that are a bit more atomic than the rowspan approach would allow. Here is a screenshot of what I came up with. keep in mind, this is all still pre-alpha stuff, so comments are welcome 🙂

An image of the Ankhos Calendar application

I learned some lessons from Google calendar that helped me make this calendar work.

Great, so you can make a calendar, whoopee!  But why should an oncologist who has plenty of other EMR options care about my simple calendar? The best aspect of this calendar is its great flexibility. I can provide more screenshots later when things are a little more developed, but the next screenshot shows the mindset we are going with.Things that are not currently in the screenshot: vitals and cbcs, exam scheduling, some other undisclosed features.

The main requirement we are trying to fill is to make changing a chemotherapy schedule as easy as possible. Just let your imagination run wild with some of the crazy things that might require a schedule change:

1. Patient is not tolerating a treatment well, reduce by 10% for next week only

2. Patient cannot come in today, shift all treatments down one day.

3. Patient should not receive this drug today

4. Set the dose of a particular drug on a particular day to some absolute value

5. Eliminate a drug entirely from the latter half of a scheduled regimen (without changing the published regimen)

…Can you come up with more? (you don’t have to be an oncologist to answer!)

You can see that these options quickly can get overwhelming if you don’t structure your scheduling system correctly.

Below is a screenshot of PART of our solution. Again,we are in pre-alpha phase, but this is an idea of what we are thinking:

Ankhos chemotherapy manipulation image.

Chemotherapy scheduling will be as easy and flexible as possible in Ankhos

As far as changing the dates, you can drag and drop any treatment onto another date and it will record the date change. Our (currently unimplemented idea) is to hold down the <ctrl> key to have the date changes propagate to all subsequent days.  Maybe one day I will have either a scripted or online demo, but that I believe that is far in the future. If you have specific questions, please let me know!

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